Posts Tagged ‘Christianity’

Do You Have the Key?

My phone rang yesterday, and an unfamiliar number came up on the screen– but the voice on the other end was my daughter.  “Mom, are you at home?”

“Yes, what’s wrong? Where are you calling from?”

“The neighbors.  I locked myself out of the house. Do you still have my spare house key?” (There’s a reason for this question, I’ll tackle that later)

“I think so.”

“Good.  I’m locked out of the house.  And Logan is inside sleeping.”

I quickly grabbed every key hanging on our refrigerator and jumped in the car to head to my daughter’s house.  Fortunately, I’m on vacation from work this week, and she only lives a mile from my house.  No biggie, in comparison to much worse situations, but still concerning.  I delivered the key (now I know which one is hers), thanked her neighbor, and headed back home.

I can’t help but thinking that we live in a world where people get themselves into some difficult situations.  Some are more desperate and tragic than others, but difficult nonetheless.  I might have a key that would fit their situation.  A key that would point them to Jesus.  A kind word, a helping hand, a needed meal or clothing, something that’s just hanging around waiting to be used.  While I can’t possibly help every person with every problem, if I’m attuned to God’s voice, I can use some unique key, a God-given  gift or talent, my resources, my influence,  to help unlock them from their dilemma.   I’ve found the more I listen and obey God’s voice in these situations, the more He uses me.  And guess what?  I get the blessing in return.

Paul exhorts the church in Rome:  “Just as each of us has one body with many members, and these members do not all have the same function, so in Christ we who are many form one body, and each member belongs to all the others.  We have different gifts, according to the grace given us.” Romans 12: 4-6a (NIV)  Further along in that section he mentions specific gifts, and then says — “if you’ve got it, use it!” (Egidio paraphrase)

Back to that key story . . . a couple years ago Lizz asked us if we had her spare Mustang key.  Hmmm. The one she hung on the ‘frig?  Hmmm.   Well. Dad was going through the keys on the ‘frig and said, “We don’t own a Ford anymore, why do we still have this key?”  And threw it away.  Ooops!  Sorry, baby.

See you later, I’m gonna go label the spare keys.  Got any you’re not using?

Copyright Mary Egidio 2012 — permission is granted to reproduce this devotional, but with attribution, and not for commercial purposes.

Anticipation

One of my favorite family activities as a child was when we loaded the car and drove to Chautauqua Lake, just over into New York state.  My dad belonged to a club there on the lake.  We’d meet friends and spend a carefree day fishing, picnicking, and just having fun.   I loved the smell of the water, the whzzzz of a line being cast, the tug of a nibble as I watched the bobber float in the lake.  Nightcrawlers and minnows were my friends.  I often made the first catch, even as a young girl. 

The trip to the lake seemed to take forever, but it was less than an hour from home.  I remember a spot on the way, at the crest of a hill, where we could catch a glimpse of the sparkling water shimmering in the distance.  “There it is!” we’d cry.  “We’re almost there.”  We were still a number of miles away, but catching a brief glimpse of the lake ahead made the trip more bearable.

The Bible promises believers a home in heaven some day.  As followers of Jesus, the journey often seems endless, especially when we’re going through difficult days.  But every once in a while, God blesses us with a brief glimpse of the prize ahead.  We may hear or read about someone’s near-death experience, and their vision of heaven.  We may be privileged to be with a godly loved-one who is crossing over, and hear them talk about the departed family members who are welcoming them home. 

God gave John a glimpse of heaven, which he recorded in the book of Revelation.  His testimony serves as encouragement to Christians of every generation.  In it, he describes the city of God, the New Jerusalem:  “The city does not need the sun or the moon to shine on it, for the glory of God gives it light, and the Lamb is its lamp.  The nations will walk by its light, and the kings of the earth will bring their splendor into it. On no day will its gates ever be shut, for there will be no night there. . . . Then the angel showed me the river of the water of life, as clear as crystal, flowing from the throne of God and of the Lamb down the middle of the great street of the city.  On each side of the river stood the tree of life, bearing twelve crops of fruit, yielding its fruit every month.  And the leaves of the tree are for the healing of the nations.  No longer will there be any curse. . . . There will be no more night. ” Revelation 21:23-25; 22:1-3a, 5a (NIV)

No night, no darkness, no pain, no sorrow, no suffering, no disease, no curse, no sin.  Only the light of God’s glory.  Be encouraged, dear ones.  It won’t be long now.  Look ahead.  It’s just over the next hill.

Copyright 2012 – Mary Egidio   — Permission is granted to share this post, but only with attribution, and not for commercial purposes.

The Art of Being Nice

My kids once had a bus driver named Mrs. Nice.  Really, I’m not making this up.  Of course, in our house, the jokes abounded:  “She’s a Nice lady.  Her kids are probably Nice kids.  When her husband proposed, he said, ‘You would be Nice if you married me.'”  Terribly original, I’m sure.

Dictionary.com defines nice as pleasing, agreeable, or delightful.(A nice visit)  Or amicably pleasant, kind (they are always nice to strangers).  We teach our grandson to be nice to the dog, which means to pet her softly and not pull on her ears or tail.  He’s still working on it.

Paul encourages the Ephesians to be nice, too.  He says, “Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you.” (Ephesians 4:32)  Sound impossible?  He goes on to urge them to “Be imitators of God, therefore, as dearly loved children . . .” (5:1a)   That makes more sense.  We can only really be nice to each other when we allow the source of Love — God — to love through us.

I’ll be the first to admit that sometimes I don’t feel like being nice.  Oh, I don’t think I could ever be downright nasty to someone.  I’m not that bad.  But always being as kind and patient as I should be, as God would be?  With certain people, in certain circumstances, I can be just plain —  well — not nice.  How about you?

It’s easy to make the excuse that I’m just tired, or busy, or distracted.  Sorry.  Didn’t mean to be unkind.  I’m so glad that my Heavenly Father is never too tired or busy or distracted to be nice to me.

So I’m still working on not pulling ears or tails, even a little bit.  Thankfully I have the best teacher in the Universe.

Copyright 2012 – Mary E. Egidio –  permission is granted to share this post, but with attribution, and not for commercial purposes.